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OpenID Connect

Authelia currently supports the OpenID Connect OP role as a beta feature. The OP role is the OpenID Connect Provider role, not the Relaying Party or RP role. This means other applications that implement the OpenID Connect RP role can use Authelia as an authentication and authorization backend similar to how you may use social media or development platforms for login.

The Relaying Party role is the role which allows an application to use GitHub, Google, or other OpenID Connect providers for authentication and authorization. We do not intend to support this functionality at this moment in time.

Roadmap

We have decided to implement OpenID Connect as a beta feature, it’s suggested you only utilize it for testing and providing feedback, and should take caution in relying on it in production as of now. OpenID Connect and it’s related endpoints are not enabled by default unless you specifically configure the OpenID Connect section.

The beta will be broken up into stages. Each stage will bring additional features. The following table is a rough plan for which stage will have each feature, and may evolve over time:

Stage Feature Description
beta1 (4.29.0) User Consent
Authorization Code Flow
OpenID Connect Discovery
RS256 Signature Strategy
Per Client Scope/Grant Type/Response Type Restriction
Per Client Authorization Policy (1FA/2FA)
Per Client List of Valid Redirection URI's
Confidential Client Type
beta2 (4.30.0) Userinfo Endpoint (missed in beta1)
Parameter Entropy Configuration
Token/Code Lifespan Configuration
Client Debug Messages
Client Audience
Public Client Type
beta3 1 Token Storage
Audit Storage
beta4 1 Back-Channel Logout
Deny Refresh on Session Expiration
Signing Key Rotation Policy
Client Secrets Hashed in Configuration
GA 1 General Availability after previous stages are vetted for bug fixes
misc List of other features that may be implemented
Front-Channel Logout 2
OAuth 2.0 Authorization Server Metadata 2
OpenID Connect Session Management 2

¹ This stage has not been implemented as of yet.

² This individual feature has not been implemented as of yet.

Configuration

The following snippet provides a sample-configuration for the OIDC identity provider explaining each field in detail.

identity_providers:
  oidc:
    hmac_secret: this_is_a_secret_abc123abc123abc
    issuer_private_key: |
      --- KEY START
      --- KEY END
    access_token_lifespan: 1h
    authorize_code_lifespan: 1m
    id_token_lifespan: 1h
    refresh_token_lifespan: 90m
    enable_client_debug_messages: false
    clients:
      - id: myapp
        description: My Application
        secret: this_is_a_secret
        public: false
        authorization_policy: two_factor
        audience: []
        scopes:
          - openid
          - groups
          - email
          - profile
        redirect_uris:
          - https://oidc.example.com:8080/oauth2/callback
        grant_types:
          - refresh_token
          - authorization_code
        response_types:
          - code
        response_modes:
          - form_post
          - query
          - fragment
        userinfo_signing_algorithm: none

Options

hmac_secret

type: string

required: yes

The HMAC secret used to sign the OpenID Connect JWT’s. The provided string is hashed to a SHA256 byte string for the purpose of meeting the required format. You must generate this option yourself.

Should be defined using a secret which is the recommended for containerized deployments.

issuer_private_key

type: string

required: yes

The private key in DER base64 encoded PEM format used to encrypt the OpenID Connect JWT’s.¹ You must generate this option yourself. To create this option, use docker run -u "$(id -u):$(id -g)" -v "$(pwd)":/keys authelia/authelia:latest authelia rsa generate --dir /keys to generate both the private and public key in the current directory. You can then paste the private key into your configuration.

Should be defined using a secret which is the recommended for containerized deployments.

access_token_lifespan

type: duration

default: 1h

required: no

The maximum lifetime of an access token. It’s generally recommended keeping this short similar to the default. For more information read these docs about token lifespan.

authorize_code_lifespan

type: duration

default: 1m

required: no

The maximum lifetime of an authorize code. This can be rather short, as the authorize code should only be needed to obtain the other token types. For more information read these docs about token lifespan.

id_token_lifespan

type: duration

default: 1h

required: no

The maximum lifetime of an ID token. For more information read these docs about token lifespan.

refresh_token_lifespan

type: string

default: 90m

required: no

The maximum lifetime of a refresh token. The refresh token can be used to obtain new refresh tokens as well as access tokens or id tokens with an up-to-date expiration. For more information read these docs about token lifespan.

A good starting point is 50% more or 30 minutes more (which ever is less) time than the highest lifespan out of the access token lifespan, the authorize code lifespan, and the id token lifespan. For instance the default for all of these is 60 minutes, so the default refresh token lifespan is 90 minutes.

enable_client_debug_messages

type: boolean

default: false

required: no

Allows additional debug messages to be sent to the clients.

minimum_parameter_entropy

type: integer

default: 8

required: no

This controls the minimum length of the nonce and state parameters.

Security Notice: Changing this value is generally discouraged, reducing it from the default can theoretically make certain scenarios less secure. It is highly encouraged that if your OpenID Connect RP does not send these parameters or sends parameters with a lower length than the default that they implement a change rather than changing this value.

clients

A list of clients to configure. The options for each client are described below.

id

type: string

required: yes

The Client ID for this client. It must exactly match the Client ID configured in the application consuming this client.

description

type: string

default: same as id

required: no

A friendly description for this client shown in the UI. This defaults to the same as the ID.

secret

type: string

required: situational

The shared secret between Authelia and the application consuming this client. This secret must match the secret configured in the application. Currently this is stored in plain text. You must generate this option yourself.

This must be provided when the client is a confidential client type, and must be blank when using the public client type. To set the client type to public see the public configuration option.

public

type: bool

default: false

required: no

This enables the public client type for this client. This is for clients that are not capable of maintaining confidentiality of credentials, you can read more about client types in RFC6749. This is particularly useful for SPA’s and CLI tools. This option requires setting the client secret to a blank string.

In addition to the standard rules for redirect URIs, public clients can use the urn:ietf:wg:oauth:2.0:oob redirect URI.

authorization_policy

type: string

default: two_factor

required: no

The authorization policy for this client: either one_factor or two_factor.

audience

type: list(string)

required: no

A list of audiences this client is allowed to request.

scopes

type: list(string)

default: openid, groups, profile, email

required: no

A list of scopes to allow this client to consume. See scope definitions for more information. The documentation for the application you want to use with Authelia will most-likely provide you with the scopes to allow.

redirect_uris

type: list(string)

required: yes

A list of valid callback URIs this client will redirect to. All other callbacks will be considered unsafe. The URIs are case-sensitive and they differ from application to application - the community has provided a list of URL´s for common applications.

Some restrictions that have been placed on clients and their redirect URIs are as follows:

  1. If a client attempts to authorize with Authelia and its redirect URI is not listed in the client configuration the attempt to authorize wil fail and an error will be generated.
  2. The redirect URIs are case-sensitive.
  3. The URI must include a scheme and that scheme must be one of http or https.
  4. The client can ignore rule 3 and use urn:ietf:wg:oauth:2.0:oob if it is a public client type.

grant_types

type: list(string)

default: refresh_token, authorization_code

required: no

A list of grant types this client can return. It is recommended that this isn’t configured at this time unless you know what you’re doing. Valid options are: implicit, refresh_token, authorization_code, password, client_credentials.

response_types

type: list(string)

default: code

required: no

A list of response types this client can return. It is recommended that this isn’t configured at this time unless you know what you’re doing. Valid options are: code, code id_token, id_token, token id_token, token, token id_token code.

response_modes

type: list(string)

default: form_post, query, fragment

required: no

A list of response modes this client can return. It is recommended that this isn’t configured at this time unless you know what you’re doing. Potential values are form_post, query, and fragment.

userinfo_signing_algorithm

type: string

default: none

required: no

The algorithm used to sign the userinfo endpoint responses. This can either be none or RS256.

Generating a random secret

If you must provide a random secret in configuration, you can generate a random string of sufficient length. The command

LENGTH=64
tr -cd '[:alnum:]' < /dev/urandom | fold -w "${LENGTH}" | head -n 1 | tr -d '\n' ; echo

prints such a string with a length in characters of ${LENGTH} on stdout. The string will only contain alphanumeric characters. For Kubernetes, see this section too.

Scope Definitions

openid

This is the default scope for openid. This field is forced on every client by the configuration validation that Authelia does.

JWT Field JWT Type Authelia Attribute Description
sub string Username The username the user used to login with
scope string scopes Granted scopes (space delimited)
scp array[string] scopes Granted scopes
iss string hostname The issuer name, determined by URL
at_hash string N/A Access Token Hash
aud array[string] N/A Audience
exp number N/A Expires
auth_time number N/A The time the user authenticated with Authelia
rat number N/A The time when the token was requested
iat number N/A The time when the token was issued
jti string(uuid) N/A JWT Identifier

groups

This scope includes the groups the authentication backend reports the user is a member of in the token.

JWT Field JWT Type Authelia Attribute Description
groups array[string] Groups The users display name

email

This scope includes the email information the authentication backend reports about the user in the token.

JWT Field JWT Type Authelia Attribute Description
email string email[0] The first email address in the list of emails
email_verified bool N/A If the email is verified, assumed true for the time being
alt_emails array[string] email[1:] All email addresses that are not in the email JWT field

profile

This scope includes the profile information the authentication backend reports about the user in the token.

JWT Field JWT Type Authelia Attribute Description
name string display_name The users display name

Endpoint Implementations

This is a table of the endpoints we currently support and their paths. This can be requrired information for some RP’s, particularly those that don’t use discovery. The paths are appended to the end of the primary URL used to access Authelia. For example in the Discovery example provided you access Authelia via https://auth.example.com, the discovery URL is https://auth.example.com/.well-known/openid-configuration.

Endpoint Path
Discovery .well-known/openid-configuration
JWKS api/oidc/jwks
Authorization api/oidc/authorize
Token api/oidc/token
Introspection api/oidc/introspect
Revocation api/oidc/revoke
Userinfo api/oidc/userinfo